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plane_frontAeroplane traces its lineage back to the weekly The Aeroplane, launched in June 1911, and is still continuing to provide the best historic-aviation coverage around. Aeroplane magazine is dedicated to offering the most in-depth and entertaining read on all aspects of aviation history and preservation. With a distinct emphasis on military machines from the 1930s, 1940s, 1950s and 1960s, the magazine features such icons as the Spitfire, Hurricane, Lancaster and many more. However, Aeroplane also regularly includes articles on historic civil light aircraft and other types that are scarcely covered elsewhere – making it the most balance historic aviation monthly on the market.

 
     
   
     

 

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RN Phantom restored PDF Print E-mail
Tuesday, 09 September 2014 00:00

Stunning McDonnell Phantom FG.1, XV586, wearing the Omega tail markings of 892NAS making its post-restoration debut at the Yeovilton Air Day on July 26. (Dean West)Stunning McDonnell Phantom FG.1, XV586, wearing the Omega tail markings of 892NAS making its post-restoration debut at the Yeovilton Air Day on July 26. (Dean West)

At Royal Naval Air Station Yeovilton, McDonnell Douglas Phantom FG.1, XV586 has been restored back into it Naval Air Squadron colours which it wore during the 1970s. As part of the Royal Navy’s preparations for fielding the two new Queen Elizabeth-class aircraft carriers and the Navy’s imminent return to big-deck carrier strike operations, Royal Navy Command staff officers realised there were just two surviving FG.1s that saw squadron service with the Royal Navy. Both were at RAF Leuchars in Scotland, having moved to the RAF after the RN relinquished the aeroplanes in 1978. Following a formal exchange of letters between the CO at RNAS Yeovilton and the Station Commander at RAF Leuchars XV586 was repatriated to Somerset during the spring of 2012.

Initial efforts focussed on making the airframe safe for static display and, since available resources were extremely limited and the project heavily reliant on the enthusiasm of volunteers, the aim was to complete a cosmetic restoration in time for the RNAS Yeovilton Air Day 2014. The project attracted a great deal of interest across the air station, and many people gave up their spare time to help, three key individuals being Chief Petty Officer Ian Luck and Petty Officers John Carter and Stephen Roberts from 1710 NAS, a specialist aviation technical support unit. The Navy also singled out SerCo Ltd for their good will and co-operation.

Perhaps we will see this historic jet displayed on the flight deck of a Queen Elizabeth–class carrier during the commissioning ceremony in 2016?